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Images of beauty and destruction - Hurricane Irma photos from Tampa Bay, Florida and the Caribbean

A rough surf surrounds Boynton Beach inlet as Hurricane Irma hits in Boynton Beach, Fla. (Jim Rassol/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

A rough surf surrounds Boynton Beach inlet as Hurricane Irma hits in Boynton Beach, Fla. (Jim Rassol/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Update: 6 new images added on Friday, September 15, 2017.

14 new images added on Thursday, September 14, 2017

Events such as Hurricane Irma often produce images of beauty as well as destruction. Here is a mix of images -- from Tampa Bay, Florida and the Caribbean -- some portraying the destructive power of Irma, some portraying the beauty, and a few that combine both in a single photo.

All photos are from the the Tampa Bay Times or their various wire services and were transmitted or published between September 11 and September 14. (The newest images are added at the top of the post.)

(SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times)

Beach erosion occurred at Upham Beach, St. Pete Beach during Hurricane Irma. A sand cliff has formed on part of the beach. The view is looking south.

(Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

FORT LAUDERDALE, FL - SEPTEMBER 10: Trees bend in the tropical storm wind along North Fort Lauderdale Beach Boulevard as Hurricane Irma hits the southern part of the state September 10, 2017 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The powerful hurricane made landfall in the United States in the Florida Keys at 9:10 a.m. after raking across the north coast of Cuba.

(Washington Post photo by Jabin Botsford)

Floodwater covers a scrapyard full of vehicles in Callahan, Fla.

(Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

Storm clouds form and move toward the coast in Naples, Fla., on Friday, Sept. 8, 2017.

(Gary Lloyd McCullough/The Florida Times-Union via AP)

A house slides into the Atlantic Ocean in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017.

(Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

MIDDLEBURG, FL - SEPTEMBER 13: Floodwaters from Hurricane Irma recede September 13, 2017 in Middleburg, Florida. Flooding in town from the Black Creek topped the previous high water mark by about seven feet and water entered the second story of many homes.

(Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

VILANO BEACH, FL - SEPTEMBER 13: Jose Orosz walks his dog Karen by a beachfront home destroyed by Hurricane Irma on September 13, 2017 in Vilano Beach, Florida. Nearly 4 million people remained without power more than two days after Irma swept through the state.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

MIAMI, FL - SEPTEMBER 13: Horses are seen in a flooded field after Hurricane Irma passed through the area on September 13, 2017 in Miami, Florida. The Florida Keys took the brunt of the hurricane as it passed over the island chain as a category 4 storm.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

BIG PINE KEY, FL - SEPTEMBER 13: A damaged home is seen after Hurricane Irma passed through the area on September 13, 2017 in Big Pine Key, Florida. The Florida Key's took the brunt of the hurricane as it passed over the island chain as a category 4 storm.

(Scott Clause/The Daily Advertiser via AP)

The sun sets over the St Johns River near downtown Jacksonville, Fla. as flood waters still fill the streets after Hurricane Irma, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017.

(Caribbean Buzz via AP)

This photo provided by Caribbean Buzz shows boats clustered together after Hurricane Irma Friday, Sept. 8, 2017.

(Johnny Milano/The New York Times)

The Castillo de San Marcos, the oldest masonry fort in North America, in St. Augustine, Fla., on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. St. Augustine is no stranger to sunny-day flooding, but the back-to-back hits from Matthew and Irma were the first major hurricanes to descend here since Dora in the 1960s, and they have left residents soaked, frustrated and, in some cases, worried about the future.

(Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

This photo shows damaged homes in Big Pine Key, Fla., the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. Irma laid waste to beautiful Caribbean islands and caused historic destruction across Florida. The cleanup will take weeks; recovery will take months.

(Scott Clause/The Daily Advertiser via AP)

Damaged homes near Marathon, Fla., Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, after Hurricane Irma. Florida is cleaning up and embarking on rebuilding from Hurricane Irma, one of the most destructive hurricanes in its history.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

HOMESTEAD, FL - SEPTEMBER 13: A milky colored Florida Bay is seen after Hurricane Irma passed through the area on September 13, 2017 in Homestead, Florida. The Florida Keys took the brunt of the hurricane as it passed over the island chain as a category 4 storm.

(Luke Sharrett/The New York Times)

Sarah Boessenecker tries to climb up onto a boardwalk after tropical system Irma caused significant beach erosion in Folly Beach, S.C., Sept. 12, 2017. Downgraded to a tropical depression, Irma left Florida in shambles as it moved into Georgia, Alabama and the Carolinas.

(Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

IMMOKALEE, FL - SEPTEMBER 13: A child walks through flooded streets in the rural migrant worker town of Immokalee, which was especially hard hit by Hurricane Irma on September 13, 2017 in Immokalee, Florida. Hurricane Irma made landfall near Naples after inundating the Florida Keys. Electricity was out in much of the region with extensive flooding.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

A mobile home community is flooded in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Everglades City, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017.

(Kevin Hagen/The New York Times)

Rain and wind during the arrival of Hurricane Irma on Brickell Key in Miami, Sept. 10, 2017. For millions of people in Florida, Hurricane Irma was their first major hurricane. Overtime, some things have changed about hurricanes - technology, forecasting, preparedness. Some have not - danger, power, human indecision in dealing with the storm.

Washington Post photo by Michael S. Williamson

Power lines fell as a result of Hurricane Irma's winds along Corkscrew Road near Estero, Fla., Monday, Sept. 11, 2017.

(Photo by Matt McClain -Pool/Getty Images)

FLORIDA KEYS, FL - SEPTEMBER 11: Overturned trailer homes are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma on September 11, 2017 over the Florida Keys, Florida

(AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Floodwaters surround Gilbert's Resort in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, Monday, Sept. 11, 2017, in Key Largo, Fla.

(Kevin Hagen/The New York Times)

The sun rises over battered palm trees as Miami Beach remained closed to incoming traffic days after Hurricane Irma hit Florida, Sept. 12, 2017. Downgraded to a tropical depression, Irma left Florida in shambles as it moved into Georgia, Alabama and the Carolinas.

(Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

JACKSONVILLE, FL - SEPTEMBER 11: A rainbow appears over storm surge flood waters from Hurricane Irma along the St. Johns River in the Five Points neighborhood Sept. 11, 2017 in Jacksonville, Florida. Flooding in downtown Jacksonville along the river topped a record set during Hurricane Dora in 1965.

MONICA HERNDON | Tampa Bay Times

The Wish Tree at the Dali Museum was uprooted on September 11, 2017 after Hurricane Irma passed through St. Petersburg, Fla. last night.

TRACEE STOCKWELL | Tampa Bay Times

Memorial Park Funeral Home on 49th St. N. in St. Petersburg is over 65 years and had several of there old large trees damages by hurricane Irma.

ALESSANDRA DA PRA | Tampa Bay Times

High water and waves are seen at Cypress Point Park located at 5620 W Cypress Street, in Tampa, Fla., on Monday, September 11, 2017, after Hurricane Irma hit the Tampa Bay Area.

JAMES BORCHUCK | Tampa Bay Times

Bill Bigelow of St. Petersburg looks under the root ball of a 50-foot Monkey Puzzle evergreen tree after it toppled over during Hurricane Irma and landed on his roof Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. Bigelow also had a Cedar Tree, right, land on his home on 86th Ave. North.

TRACEE STOCKWELL | Tampa Bay Times

A beehive was blown out of a palm tree in the backyard of 59th Lane and 64th Terrace N. in Pinellas Park due to heavy winds from hurricane Irma that came through Sunday night into Monday morning.

(AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

Boats lay washed up on the beach after the passage of Hurricane Irma, in Phillipsburg, St. Martin, Monday, September 11, 2017. Irma cut a path of devastation across the northern Caribbean, leaving thousands homeless after destroying buildings and uprooting trees.

(Photo by Jose Jimenez/Getty Images)

PHILIPSBURG, ST MAARTEN - SEPTEMBER 11: A man walks among the destruction left by Hurricane Irma at the Phillipsburg Town Beach on September 11, 2017 in Philipsburg, St. Maarten. The Caribbean island sustained extensive damage from powerful storm.

Tim Rozgonyi

Twitter: @timrozgonyi

e-mail: [email protected]

Images of beauty and destruction - Hurricane Irma photos from Tampa Bay, Florida and the Caribbean 09/13/17 [Last modified: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 10:07am]
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© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

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