Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Video: Not now, I'm on the telly! Children bust in on dad's live BBC interview

Live TV is an unpredictable yet delightful beast.

Professor Robert Kelly, an international relations expert, discovered just that Friday during an interview with BBC World News about South Korean President Park Geun-hye's impeachment.

Kelly, a widely respected political science professor at Pusan National University in South Korea, was providing his expert opinion on camera, from what appeared to be his home office, when his young children came barreling into the room.

"I would argue that this is a triumph of democracy," Kelly said via Skype. "Scandals happen all the time. The question is how do democracies respond to those scandals?"

Cue a dancing toddler in pigtails and a bright yellow sweater.

"And what will it mean for the wider region — I think one of your children has just walked in," BBC presenter James Menendez said, before resuming the exchange and asking: "Do you think relations with the North may change?"

Then, an infant in a walker opened the door and, with a small thrust, rolled into the room — followed by a seemingly frantic woman who tried to collect them.

Kelly, keeping his eyes straight ahead and holding back the toddler with one hand, launched into his response: "I would be surprised if they do. The — pardon me. My apologies. Sorry."

The woman scooped up the children and hustled them out of the room.

Kelly then closed his eyes and took a long, deep breath.

"South Korea's policy choices on North Korea have been severely limited in the last six months to a year," he continued, as his children cried out from another room.

Kelly is a well-known analyst on Korean matters who has provided expert opinion for a number of media outlets, including the Washington Post.

In November, he told the Post that Geun-hye had lost her legitimacy in regards to the opposition and that the government would be "paralyzed" if she refused to step down.

He has also written for Foreign Affairs and the Economist, among other publications.

Kelly did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

But after the interview, he responded on Twitter to a producer asking to use the video clip, asking: "Is this kinda thing that goes 'viral' and gets weird?"

"Too late I suspect," replied Henry Williams, with the Wall Street Journal.

Kelly has been criticized by some for his reaction to the interruption.

But others called it "magical TV," "one of the funniest things I've seen" and "TV gold."

Asked about the episode, a BBC spokesman told the Post: "We're really grateful to professor Kelly for his professionalism. This just goes to show that live broadcasting isn't always child's play."

Professor Robert Kelly, an international relations expert, was doing a live interview with BBC World News about South Korea when his children crashed into the office. [Screengrab]

Professor Robert Kelly, an international relations expert, was doing a live interview with BBC World News about South Korea when his children crashed into the office. [Screengrab]

Video: Not now, I'm on the telly! Children bust in on dad's live BBC interview 03/10/17 [Last modified: Friday, March 10, 2017 1:18pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Peter Budaj, Lightning lose to Devils in shootout; Nikita Kucherov scores

    Lightning Strikes

    NEWARK, N.J. — For Peter Budaj, Tuesday's season debut had a shaky start.

    The Lightning’s Vladislav Namestnikov, right, battles Damon Severson for the puck.
  2. Mother's testimony about toddler's death brings judge to tears

    Criminal

    TAMPA — Nayashia Williams woke up early on May 7, 2014, to the sound of her daughter calling for her. It was the last time the young mother's mornings would begin with a summons from Myla Presley, who couldn't yet climb over the mesh fencing around the playpen she used as a bed.

    Deandre Gilmore looks towards the gallery Tuesday in a Tampa courtroom. Gilmore is accused of killing the 19 month-old daughter of his girlfriend in 2014. He said the child fell while he was giving her a bath. [CHRIS URSO   |   Times]
  3. Speakers: Getting tough can't be only response to teen car thefts

    Crime

    ST. PETERSBURG — Bob Dillinger remembers coming to Pinellas County as a legal intern in 1975. There were five major poverty zones in St. Petersburg.

    Wengay Newton, Florida House of Representatives (in front, in center), talks as a panelist to a packed room during a community forum on "Reclaiming our Youth: Is Juvenile Justice a Reality?" at the Dr. Carter G. Woodson Museum in St. Petersburg Wednesday evening (10/17/17). The event was presented by the Fred G. Minnis, Sr. Bar Association. Community leaders discussed the ongoing auto theft epidemic among Pinellas youth.
  4. Internal White House documents allege manufacturing decline increases abortions, infertility and spousal abuse

    Politics

    White House officials working on trade policy were alarmed last month when a top adviser to President Donald Trump circulated a two-page document that alleged a weakened manufacturing sector leads to an increase in abortion, spousal abuse, divorce and infertility, two people familiar with the matter told the …

  5. Black entrepreneur says city stiffing him on project after he endorsed Rick Baker

    News

    ST. PETERSBURG — A prominent African-American resident says his endorsement of mayoral candidate Rick Baker has led city officials to freeze him out of a major construction project along the historic "Deuces" stretch of 22nd Street S.