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Rick Scott

Richard Lynn Scott

    Rick Scott is a Republican elected governor of Florida in 2010. He defeated Democrat Alex Sink, the state's chief financial officer, in the closest governor's race since 1876. He also spent $73 million of his own money to introduce himself to Floridians, having no political experience and barely met residency requirements.

    Rick Scott is the former CEO of Columbia/HCA and also started Solantic. Scott was born Dec. 1, 1952, in Bloomington, Ill. He served in the Navy and graduated from the University of Missouri-Kansas City and Southern Methodist University Law School. He and his wife, Frances Annette, have two adult daughters.

    

    1. Gov. Rick Scott's family history of alcohol abuse could decide 'liquor wall" bill

      Legislature

      TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott must decide Wednesday whether to let Walmart and other big-box stores sell liquor, and he says a factor in his decision is the history of alcohol abuse in his family.

      Florida Governor Rick Scott is considering a veto of a bill that would allow Walmart, Target and other big box retail stores to sell liquor. [Andres Leiva | Tampa Bay Times]
    2. John Morgan 'prepared to invest $100M' in medical marijuana

      State Roundup

      John Morgan spent nearly $7 million pushing two statewide ballot initiatives to expand medical marijuana throughout the state of Florida.

      Personal injury lawyer John Morgan says he's ready to invest $100 million in medical marijuana. [SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times]
    3. For Gov. Rick Scott, 'fighting' could mean vetoing entire state budget

      State Roundup

      Every day, Gov. Rick Scott is getting a lot of advice.

      The last time a Florida governor vetoed the education portion of the state budget was in 1983. Gov. Bob Graham blasted fellow Democrats for their “willing acceptance of mediocrity.”
    4. Potential new laws further curb Floridians' right to government in the Sunshine

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — From temporarily shielding the identities of murder witnesses to permanently sealing millions of criminal and arrest records, state lawmakers did more this spring than they have in all but one of the past 22 years to chip away at Floridians' constitutional guarantees to access government records and …

      The Legislature passed 17 new exemptions to the Sunshine Law, according to a tally by the First Amendment Foundation.
    5. While Hillsborough, St. Pete colleges take a budget hit — public universities get more

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — As Senate President Joe Negron aims to make Florida's 12 public universities "elite" destinations, state lawmakers this spring voted to give an extra $232 million next year to those institutions — while simultaneously cutting $25 million that has helped the state's 28 state colleges serve …

      Florida Senate President Joe Negron talk to members in the chamber. [SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times].
    6. State Supreme Court rejects massive expansion of slot machines

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — In a major defeat for counties that wanted to authorize slot machines by referendum, the Florida Supreme Court on Thursday unanimously ruled that Florida counties have no legal authority to ask voters to approve slot machines at existing pari-mutuel race tracks or jai-alai frontons without …

      In 2008 about 800 Vegas-style slot machines were installed in the Seminole Hard Rock Casino and Hotel in Hollywood Florida. The Florida Supreme Court ruled Thursday against expanding the use of slot machines in parimutuels throughout Florida. [Willie J. Allen Jr. | Times]
    7. Election experts begged lawmakers for new tool to fight voter fraud, but got nothing

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — As President Donald J. Trump repeatedly makes unfounded claims of people having voted twice in the last election, Florida had an easy way to make it much less likely.

      But the state Legislature did nothing.

      White House chief strategist Steve  Bannon was registered to vote in two states, New York and Florida, before he contacted Sarasota County to remove his name from the voter rolls in November. A bill that would have allowed Florida to join a nationwide database that would better detect double registrations failed to pass this year's legislative session. [Associated Press]
    8. How profitable will medical-marijuana shops be? Very, says confidential pitch for investors

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — As differences over pot shop restrictions burned a medical marijuana bill to ashes in Tallahassee, one of Florida's largest legal cannabis operators courted millions of dollars from new investors and touted a lucrative plan to open dozens of storefronts around the state.

      Medical marijuana products are on display in the "Garden" at Surterra Wellness Center, 2558 E Fowler Ave. in  Tampa. [CHERIE DIEZ   |   Times]
    9. Veto schools bill and education budget, critics urge Gov. Scott

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott faces mounting pressure from school superintendents, teachers unions and parent groups to veto $23.7 billion in base funding to K-12 public schools next year — as well as a controversial $419 million education policy bill that lawmakers unveiled and passed in the span of just …

      Joining other superintendents from large counties, Pinellas County Schools Superintendent Mike Grego is urging Gov. Rick Scott to reject the education budget and a massive education bill, HB 7069. [DIRK SHADD | Tampa Bay Times]
    10. Medical marijuana special session in limbo: It's up to Rick Scott or Joe Negron

      State Roundup

      TALLAHASSEE — As support builds for lawmakers to return to the state Capitol to pass medical marijuana language, two of the three men who could call a special session have been quiet about their plans.

      Florida Governor Rick Scott announces during a press conference at Jungle Island that the number of tourists visiting the state for the first three months of 2017 was about 31.1 million people. Once again, he demurred when asked about calling a special session for medical marijuana. "I'm looking at all my options," he told reporters on Monday.  [Joe Raedle | Getty Images]